DogMan12
Posts: 64
Joined: Tue Jun 11, 2013 5:57 am
Location: Kooskooskie, WA

Re: Hypermiling the i-MiEV

Fri Jan 02, 2015 8:22 am

I coast and manage hills on my daily commute, and usually consume one bar for the 16.5 miles inbound with a net elevation loss of 1,300 feet. It takes 6 or 7 bars to get home.

WHEN THERE IS NO ONE ELSE ON THE ROAD I accelerate gently on the downslopes and coast on the flats and even many uphills. My speed varies a lot, from 30 to 50. WHEN THERE IS TRAFFIC I coast downhill and power uphill, maintaining no more than a 5 mph variation in speed, +/- 2.5 mph of the speed limit.

I actually do the same things in my ICE commuter, and have achieved 45-50 mpg overall in a car rated at 37 mpg.

There is no way around the physics of work. Acceleration is work. Press the go pedal like there is a raw egg between it and your foot, and you will be efficient even without radical hypermiling techniques.
Dog Man Son
2012 iMiEV
We call it not Raspberry, but Metallic Malbec

jray3
Posts: 1500
Joined: Tue Dec 06, 2011 1:05 am
Location: Tacoma area, WA
Contact: Website

Re: Hypermiling the i-MiEV

Fri Jan 02, 2015 11:31 am

DogMan, sounds like we have a similar commute, though I only have 525 feet of net elevation loss over 16 miles. I agree with these points. Even on a 6% downslope it's hard to coast past 65 mph. If you've got the time and won't hold back traffic, regenning down the mountain at slow speed would yield dividends. Here's a post with mountain road trip details.
viewtopic.php?f=9&t=1177&start=10&hilit=Leavenworth
2012 i-SE "MR BEAN" 87,000 miles
2012 i-ES traded at 21,648 miles
1983 Grumman Kurbwatt,170 kW, 32 kWh
1983 Mazda RX-7 EV 43 kW 10 kWh
1971 "Karmann Eclectric" EV 240 kW 19 kWh
1965 Karmann Ghia Cabriolet

DogMan12
Posts: 64
Joined: Tue Jun 11, 2013 5:57 am
Location: Kooskooskie, WA

Re: Hypermiling the i-MiEV

Sun Jan 04, 2015 8:11 pm

None of my grades are steep or long enough to get much out of regen without slowing down below 30, which even for me is too slow. I don't mind taking 26 minutes, but that is about as long as I want to take on the road. At .09/kwh, getting deep into the last 5% of efficiency is just about bragging rights on forums, ( :lol: ) not about any significant savings.
Dog Man Son
2012 iMiEV
We call it not Raspberry, but Metallic Malbec

JoeS
Site Moderator
Posts: 3477
Joined: Thu Dec 15, 2011 5:47 am
Location: Los Altos Hills, California

Re: Hypermiling the i-MiEV

Wed Jan 21, 2015 5:58 pm

As you read the previous posts on this thread, you can see that I abruptly stopped the discussion before addressing the key i-MiEV range-robbing element: aerodynamic drag at speed.

The solution is elementary: have some large vehicle push the air aside and then follow it. The range-increasing results are dramatic! This graph http://myimiev.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=17565#p17565 needs no explanation - imagine traveling at 60 mph while only facing an effective headwind of, say, 30 mph: from the graph, instead of a range of 50 miles at 60mph we now get a range of 100 miles!

No, I'm not advocation NASCAR-style drafting, but a significant benefit can be derived from following large vehicles, yet at a distance that allows for taking evasive action in emergencies.

As some of you might recall, last June while traveling on Interstate 5 in my Gen1 Honda Insight I was hit from behind by a drunk driver. Before the accident I had been safely following a huge truck for a couple of hundred miles but, unfortunately, the truck had just turned off the highway and I was left nakedly exposed continuing down the highway at 60mph (the speed limit for cars on this very long and straight Interstate is 70mph), of course in the right lane. Within a couple of miles I got whapped as this drunk veered from the left lane into mine while traveling at what I estimate to be >100mph. The string of cars in the left lane was passing me going around 70mph and this driver came upon them quickly and suddenly veered into the right lane not seeing my small car there. I'm happy to be alive, but this incident got me thinking about the whole issue of efficient driving, visibility, and safety.

Following trucks has the major disadvantage of one not being able to see the road ahead, which means that road debris can unexpectedly and unavoidably suddenly appear from under the truck. Sadly in recent years, this is also a peril for all small car drivers as SUVs and pickup trucks have proliferated the landscape. This is also the major hazard motorcyclists face on a daily basis.

The other traditional concern of following trucks too closely simply doesn't apply: barring a sudden-stop accident by the truck ahead and given reasonable responsiveness by the car driver, in an emergency the car will stop much faster than a truck.

In California, multi-axle trucks have a speed limit of 55mph, which means that they usually travel at 58-62mph, a speed that is just fine for covering longer Interstate distances in our i-MiEV. Based on my own recent experience described above, the major advantage of driving at 60mph and following a truck is that the truck offers a visual barrier to anyone coming up quickly from behind.

When following trucks or other large vehicles, each of us must decide for ourselves what the comfortable and safe distance is for that particular scenario. For example, I do try to avoid situations whereby I'm sandwiched between trucks, and instead prefer just tagging along behind a solitary big rig.

After three years of driving my i-MiEV, I must say that I've rarely employed this range-maximizing technique. Almost all of my driving entails highway trip distances of under 60 miles, which the i-MiEV does comfortably without resorting to extreme hypermiling. It is only the occasional extended trip between sparse recharging opportunities which benefits from having this ace up my sleeve, if needed.
EVs: 2 Wht/Blu SE Prem., '13 Tesla MS85, 3 156v CorbinSparrows (2 Li-ion), 24v EcoScoot(LiFePO4)
EV Conv: 156v '86 Ram PU, 144v '65 Saab 96
Hybrids: 48v1kW bike
ICE: '88 Isuzu Trooper. Mothballed: '67 Saab (orig.owner), '76 MBZ L206D RHD RV

RobbW
Posts: 417
Joined: Mon Jul 08, 2013 1:23 pm
Location: Elgin, IL

Re: Hypermiling the i-MiEV

Tue Sep 22, 2015 12:49 pm

I have been intrigued reading through this thread on hypermiling our iMiEVs. JoeS, you did an awesome job with all your pointers! I so wish I could employee these hypermiling techniques. Alas, I live and commute in suburban Chicagoland with too much traffic to employ most of the techniques and not enough topographical change to take advantage of coasting/regenning down hills/mountains and such. My biggest obstacle with employing any hypermiling techniques during my normal commute is other drivers. I don't want to piss off any of my fellow commuters.

I have to deal with typical Chicagoland drivers with their complete lack of any patience and usual "screw you" attitudes. Anything I do in my Meepster that would slow down the flow of traffic is going to put me on "The List". And since I usually drive the exact same route at the exact same times of the day every day, I'm usually driving with the exact same drivers every day. So, I don't want to become known as "That Guy" whom everyone else constantly tries to beat out and gets all pissy when the end up behind me.

I'd be happy to read anyone's tips, techniques, advice and recommendations for hypermiling in urban/suburban commuting environments. Or is any potential gain from hypermiling too insignificant to be worth the effort and the ire of fellow commuters?
Clear Skies,
Robb

EV: 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV SE, Raspberry Metallic, Premium Package - Purchased 07/11/13
PHEV: 2017 Chrysler Pacifica eHybrid, Bright White, Platinum Package - Purchased 05/01/17

JoeS
Site Moderator
Posts: 3477
Joined: Thu Dec 15, 2011 5:47 am
Location: Los Altos Hills, California

Re: Hypermiling the i-MiEV

Tue Sep 22, 2015 2:20 pm

RobbW wrote:...I'd be happy to read anyone's tips, techniques, advice and recommendations for hypermiling in urban/suburban commuting environments. Or is any potential gain from hypermiling too insignificant to be worth the effort and the ire of fellow commuters?
Robb, I hypermile my Gen1 Honda Insight to save gas (the one that was crunched had a lifetime 77.0mpg over 95K miles). When I first got the i-MiEV, I continued with my hypermiling kick (to save on energy and not stress the motor and battery pack) until I slowly came to the realization that I don't need to do that, except on long trips where I'm stretching the range. With my fully-amortized PV solar, my electricity is free, and the motor and battery management simply won't let me overstress those components (but I never run my battery down low, and I become a featherfoot at about 3 bars). On a daily basis I have now reverted to my old leadfootin' ways and, especially during rush hour traffic, I 'go with the flow'. In your case, and since you're not pushing your range limits during your commute, I think the only benefit would be a negligible financial gain, which I do not think is worth the effort or "ire of fellow commuters", as that would result in their looking askance at EVs.

That said, hypermiling is a skill that belongs in everyone's toolbox, as there will be occasions when one needs to eke out a few more miles...
EVs: 2 Wht/Blu SE Prem., '13 Tesla MS85, 3 156v CorbinSparrows (2 Li-ion), 24v EcoScoot(LiFePO4)
EV Conv: 156v '86 Ram PU, 144v '65 Saab 96
Hybrids: 48v1kW bike
ICE: '88 Isuzu Trooper. Mothballed: '67 Saab (orig.owner), '76 MBZ L206D RHD RV

jray3
Posts: 1500
Joined: Tue Dec 06, 2011 1:05 am
Location: Tacoma area, WA
Contact: Website

Re: Hypermiling the i-MiEV

Tue Sep 22, 2015 4:07 pm

RobbW wrote:I don't want to become known as "That Guy" whom everyone else constantly tries to beat out and gets all pissy when the end up behind me.
...Or is any potential gain from hypermiling too insignificant to be worth the effort and the ire of fellow commuters?


Well, I'm also swimming with the same fish often, and besides being the only i-MiEV in my neck of the woods, MR BEAN is somewhat conspicuous, with the personalized plates and big 8-ball emblem up top. I employ regen to slow down waay before red lights, but then rocket through the intersection as the light turns, while the bozos who impatiently passed me are sitting still at the start line. I swear that I've seen some beneficially-modified behaviors from individual drivers after they pass through several such intersections with me... Plus, I haven't been coal-rolled yet, unlike another here.

Thing is, my commute is short enough to drive it like I stole it, so my technique tends to be more about 'winning the race' rather than true hypermiling!
2012 i-SE "MR BEAN" 87,000 miles
2012 i-ES traded at 21,648 miles
1983 Grumman Kurbwatt,170 kW, 32 kWh
1983 Mazda RX-7 EV 43 kW 10 kWh
1971 "Karmann Eclectric" EV 240 kW 19 kWh
1965 Karmann Ghia Cabriolet

JoeS
Site Moderator
Posts: 3477
Joined: Thu Dec 15, 2011 5:47 am
Location: Los Altos Hills, California

Re: Hypermiling the i-MiEV

Thu Oct 01, 2015 6:54 pm

WARNING
After failures of my Yokohama tires, perhaps the result of my previous tire overinflation, I wish to emphasize that the manufacturer's specification is 36psi. Please take this into consideration when reading my previous discussions on tire pressures.
http://myimiev.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=24356#p24356
EVs: 2 Wht/Blu SE Prem., '13 Tesla MS85, 3 156v CorbinSparrows (2 Li-ion), 24v EcoScoot(LiFePO4)
EV Conv: 156v '86 Ram PU, 144v '65 Saab 96
Hybrids: 48v1kW bike
ICE: '88 Isuzu Trooper. Mothballed: '67 Saab (orig.owner), '76 MBZ L206D RHD RV

JoeS
Site Moderator
Posts: 3477
Joined: Thu Dec 15, 2011 5:47 am
Location: Los Altos Hills, California

Re: Hypermiling the i-MiEV

Thu Apr 06, 2017 9:52 am

So, the question on the table is "how do I know I'm hypermiling successfully?".

Let's see,

1. When fully recharging the car after a drive on level ground in average temperatures and not much wind, the Range Remaining (RR) is > 85 miles (137km).

2. When you first set off with a 'full tank', you go at least ten miles (16km) before the fuel gauge drops from 16 to 15 bars.

3. While driving, the fuel gauge is at the halfway mark (8 bars) and RR reading is >45 miles (72km).

4. After driving for a couple or three hours and the car stops inexplicably, you realize you've just driven over 100 miles (160km) without looking at any of the gauges… ;)
EVs: 2 Wht/Blu SE Prem., '13 Tesla MS85, 3 156v CorbinSparrows (2 Li-ion), 24v EcoScoot(LiFePO4)
EV Conv: 156v '86 Ram PU, 144v '65 Saab 96
Hybrids: 48v1kW bike
ICE: '88 Isuzu Trooper. Mothballed: '67 Saab (orig.owner), '76 MBZ L206D RHD RV

RobbW
Posts: 417
Joined: Mon Jul 08, 2013 1:23 pm
Location: Elgin, IL

Re: Hypermiling the i-MiEV

Tue May 23, 2017 12:15 pm

JoeS wrote:So, the question on the table is "how do I know I'm hypermiling successfully?".

Let's see,

1. When fully recharging the car after a drive on level ground in average temperatures and not much wind, the Range Remaining (RR) is > 85 miles (137km).

2. When you first set off with a 'full tank', you go at least ten miles (16km) before the fuel gauge drops from 16 to 15 bars.

3. While driving, the fuel gauge is at the halfway mark (8 bars) and RR reading is >45 miles (72km).

4. After driving for a couple or three hours and the car stops inexplicably, you realize you've just driven over 100 miles (160km) without looking at any of the gauges… ;)


Sadly, I don't meet any of those criteria. I just don't drive in an environment that is conducive to maximizing any hypermiling techniques. I do what little I can when I have the opportunity.
Clear Skies,
Robb

EV: 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV SE, Raspberry Metallic, Premium Package - Purchased 07/11/13
PHEV: 2017 Chrysler Pacifica eHybrid, Bright White, Platinum Package - Purchased 05/01/17

Return to “Driving the iMiev - Range - Energy Efficiency - Operating Cost”